Amanda_Chance1.jpgJames_Green.jpg

9/01/07 VERSION: BEDSOLE HISTORY FROM 1700, WITH LIST OF ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS

http://www.ncgenweb.us/harnett/bedsole.pdf


Chief_1914_to_1993.jpgscan0043_02.jpg

GREEN FAMILY OLD HOME PLACE

BARBOUR COUNTY ALABAMA

The Green family was not always in Alabama , Chief Gardner Red Wolf Green Born around 1735 in Fannin County Georgia, he had children many live across the line in North Carolina Rutherford County, Gardner Father name was Running Fox born in the late 1690.

      

Gardner Red Wolf Green and Margaret Coil Green Born 1740 children was Benjamin F. Green Born around 1761 in North Carolina, Isaac Green Born 1775, and William Green Born around 1765. Mossie Green’s date of birth is not known; John Green was born in 1774, and Paul Green was born in 1775.                                                                                                                                              

Later Chief Benjamin F. Green moved some of the Chickamauga Cherokee tribes to Arkansas and Missouri, some of his children were Richard Green born 1775, Joseph Green born 1788, James Green born 1789, John Green born 1790, William Green date of birth is not known, Isaac F. Green born 1798, Dicey Ann Green born 1809, and later the son of Benjamin F. Green, Joseph Green fathers James Ellis Green, had a child who became the Headmother of the Indian Creek Tribe Chickamauga for many years, being Mother Helen B. Green Robinson.       

 

In Gardner Red Wolf Green’s childhood day he lived near the headwaters of Shooting Creek in North Carolina and as a young Chief, but as the war between the United States and the Chickamauga Cherokee grew in size the village and people were always moving. It is said by some that Gardner was around one hundred and fifteen years old when he was killed in  crossfire early one morning when he liked to go for his morning run. There has always been a debate about his age, and where he was laid to rest. And the only one who would know for sure where he was laid to rest was Chief George the Otter Green who took that secret with him when he passed onto the other side.


George the Otter Green was born late in the life of Gardner Red Wolf Green 1794, and George found a young mixed-blood Native American named Elizabeth Bledsole, whose father was Henry Bledsole. The family came to our lands from Germany and her mother was Hannah West Bledsole a Mixed-Blood Indian from North Carolina and part of the Croatan Indians and the modern day Lumbee tribes.


Elizabeth Bledsole owned much land in Cumberland County North Carolina as well as her brothers  family came from the old world may years before through a fort in Virginia.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            The three Bledsole brothers heard that there were free lands in North Carolina, so they set out for there. One brother started to build a cabin on Cherokee lands and got himself killed; one brother married a Cherokee girl, who began the start of the Bledsole Indians; the other brother returned to Virginia and fathered the American part of the Bledsole Family.                        


Now, back to George and Elizabeth, as the war between the Chickamauga Cherokee and the United States got larger with more heat and pressure being placed on Chief George the Otter Green and his Family, Elizabeth Bledsole Green sold her lands to her brothers. Then George and Elizabeth moved first into South Georgia where they had eight children; Alford Green born 1826 in Georgia; William Green born 1828 in Georgia, Joseph Carter Green born 1832 in Alabama, Nathan Green born 1832 in Alabama, and Martha Green born 1830 in Alabama, and three were stillborn births.  With the heat still on for George the family moved into the heart of the Creek Nation in Alabama’s Barbour County, and for a very long time lived in the Indian Creek Village, and in time they took up farming again.


Some of the first permanent white settlers that established homes in Alabama came there in 1702, although some historians say 1699. About one hundred seventy four years earlier the Spanish explorers, De Narvaes and Cabeza De Vaca, passed through the section on their exploration trips. The first white settlers to move into the territory were Spanish and French. They established Mobile, Alabama in 1702 as the first community. England won control of the region in 1763.


To evade participation in the revolutionary war many British sympathizers living in Georgia moved westward into the Alabama section in 1775. They were followed in 1783 by other planters from Georgia, Virginia and the Carolinas. A group of Scotch-Irish who had tried farming in Tennessee in 1809 settled in the northern part of Alabama, in the rich Tennessee Valley district. In the early 1800’s, former Carolinians and Virginians came into the central part of the territory.  Other groups from the same section came to the western part of Alabama along with Tombigbee and the Black Warrior rivers. But it was not until the end of the war of 1812 that Alabama saw a real influx of settlers. The conclusion of that was the beginning of a gigantic southward and westward movement which resulted in statehood for four territories between 1816 and 1819. Alabama was the last of the four to gain statehood.


Chief Joseph Carter Green born 1832, lost sight in one eye while serving in the Civil War. After all of the Green children were grown and married, Amanda Tamplin Green died on December 12, 1854. Chief Joseph Carter Green then married Martha Adkinson Green on April 2, 1903. They lived together only four or five years when Chief Joseph Carter Green fell from a wagon and was killed. Martha Adkinson Green then went to live with a daughter by a previous marriage to Ollie Taylor. Chief Joseph Carter Green’s children are George Green born February 22, 1856, John Green born May 6, 1858, William J. Green born August 18, 1861, James Monroe Green born April 25, 1866, Marietta Green Born September 7, 1868, Elizabeth Frances Green Born January 16, 1871, Nathan L. Green Born September 7, 1873, Malissa Green born October 6, 1875, Elisha Green born March 30, 1878, Martha Green born February 19, 1882, and Jesse Green born May 2, 1885.


Chief James Monroe Green was born April 25, 1866 and married on September 6, 1885, Mother Nancy Joanna (Anna) Kilpatrick Green, their children were: an unnamed son born May 10, 1886; Carrie DeLoshia Green born October 1, 1887 and died July 15, 1951; Mandy Savanna Green Chance born September 24, 1889 and died May 6, 1965; Unnamed son born September 13, 1891 and died September 22, 1891; Mollie Frances Green born February 7, 1893; James Clifford Green born July 19, 1895 and died March 23 1970; Joseph Arthur Green born December 17, 1897 and died November 12, 1958; William Martin Green born June 9, 1900; Eddis Isam Green born October 28, 1902 and died August 13, 1971; Elmer Roy Green born August 3, 1905 and died July 11, 1973.


Many of the Green Family members are laid to rest in Bethsaida Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Barbour County Alabama, and a few other Cemeteries around Alabama and Georgia.


1.    Chief James M. and Mother Anna Green, Chief James Green die January 17, 1936, Mother Nancy (Anna) Green January 23, 1939. 


2.        Mother Deloshia Green Johnson

3.        Alvie Sydney Johnson

4.       Grace Alberta Hurst Green

5.       William Gerald Green

And many, many others.


Take the time to step backward for a few seconds to try to show how and what our people did when the war moved into the Northeastern part of Alabama at the Indian Creek Village being located just south of Horseshoe Bend at the mouth of the Little Indian Creek and the Pea River. Many of our people were told by Chief Halpatter Micco (Old Billy Bowleggs) to take up farming and look after the old and the children, and to keep the history at all cost. Many passed themself off just as hard working farmers and had the food they were growing to be taken by General Andrew Jackson’s 6000 man Army as they passed on their way south after killing many women and Children at Horseshoe Bend.


Chief Halpatter Micco took many that he believed couldn’t pass themselves off as farmers or did not look as they could pass as white people.  As he took part of the tribe south into Florida and set up a new village where today you will find Lake City, Florida, the new village was first called Alligator town, only because there was a Seminole Indian call Chief Billy Bowleg who was born in 1810 already in Florida, so our Chief Billy Bowleg (born 1794) changed his name to Chief Alligator.


The Army of General Andrew Jackson killed many native people who were unable to pass themselves off as white farmers, plundering crops and homes, burning and killing. One log cabin at Horseshoe Bend was full of women and children as it burned to the ground, and on the front porch there were baskets of sweet potato’s cooking in the oils from the bodies of the Indian women and children with the soldier’s standing around eating these sweet potatoes. David Crockett said, “I did not come here to kill women and Children,” and told General Andrew Jackson the same thing, he also said, “I will not fight and kill anymore Indians” then he returned home and later went to Texas where he died at the Alamo.


Chief James Green and Anna were married on September 6, 1885 by Riley Jenkins the Justice of the Peace and a Pastor. Jim and Anna were reared by honest, hard working Indian parents; they lived in Beat 8, Barbour County Alabama.


Chief James Green was a sturdy built man, stern and strict, yet the whole tribe and family enjoyed being with him, he told my mother once that his children and tribal people were his pride and comfort. There is no surer contentment than being proud of what you have raised and care for, be it a good stand of corn or good kids and tribal family. Chief James Green was crippled all his life with an unnamed white man illness of muscle disease. In Later life, he was a diabetic and spent his later years in a wheel chair.


Anna was a slender woman about five feet, six inches, she was a member of Barker’s Methodist church, a log house which stood where Street Memorial Methodist Church now stands in Beat 8. Even though James and Anna went to the white man Church they also used Totemism as our people have always done, this came from being told to do the same things the white man would do, live like the white man, but never forget our ways and history of our people. My mother best remembered her reading her Bible or New Testament daily, while sitting outside the cabin in a circle, burning the incense as she sang her native songs. James and Anna later joined Evergreen Baptist Church and were baptized in a pool down the hill from the Church, Lon Renfroe was the Pastor. They also attended Bethsaida Primitive Baptist Church in Beat 8.


Anna’s father was Worrie Kilpatrick and her mother’s last name was Cole. Anna had one sister named Fannie and one brother named Bill. Anna’s mother had two sisters both unmarried, Nancy and Zilphia, who lived together. After Anna’s mother died, Worrie married again to a Stanley, who had a son named Dave Stanley. After Worrie married, they moved to Belleview, Florida where Worrie died. Nancy and Zilphia, the two aunts of Anna, are buried in Bethsaida Cemetery in Barbour County, Alabama.  


All the children of the Green family attended a one room building school house just as the Bledsole Indians did in North Carolina’s Simson County Indian Schools in the 1700’s and was heated by a fireplace. This school building was located across the road from the present Street Memorial Methodist Church in Barbour County, Alabama where the Green family resided. They attended school two months during the winter and one month during the spring. Each child was given three books to study, a blue-back speller, reader, and a geography book, in later years a history book. At Christmas time they received stick candy, fruit and nuts. The children were taught to fear Yowa, and to obey his laws and to respect their parents and their elders and to love one another. The Green family went places in a wagon. My father R.D. Chance use to tell me that when he was just a very young boy he would take the wagon from Indian Creek which is about fifty miles west by south to Columbus, Georgia to buy supplies, he would stop at a spring head that now sits next to Highway 165 in Russell County to get water and stay overnight going to Columbus and on the return trip home. I have been there and got water out of that spring head many times with my father before he crossed over to the other side. On Sundays they went to Church, and then gathered at one home for Totemism and for dinner, menu usually being sage hen, acorn dressing and dumplings, corn and all the trimmings. After dinner the children played Indian games in the woods and pastures on a flying jenny at times, and with a leather ball they played LaCrosse while the adults conversed. Although there weren’t many material things, the playing with firefly and watching their little light go on and off, gave many happy hours to children. There was plenty of hard work to be done and loads of fun. The children of the Green family grew up happy and content with many friends and a sense of Indian values that sustained them though out their lives. They had a bond of love, peace and happiness many families never experience.


The usual herb medicine that Indians have always used that came from the forest were kept in the lodge, were black draught, quinine, castor oil, calomel camphor, and asafetida, alcohol used as a rub made from corn, and Black Drink made from the roots that grow along the banks of the Chattahoochee River, called the dark waters by the Indians, and many other herb plants. These were later obtained from a company started in the 1800’s, the Watson Product Company which was made from many herb medicines. They drank sassafras tea and other herb teas in the springtime. For upset stomach they drank tea made from boiling blackberry roots. A knife blade or scissors were put on the nape of the neck to check a nosebleed. Minor cuts and bruises were treated by the washing of kerosene and tied with a clean cloth; burns were coated with axle grease or butter and bandaged. Snake bites were cut and drained, and you drank as much buttermilk as you could before you threw it all up. And there were many others too numerous to mention at this time.


Some still call the house the ole home place, and the lands of our people, but let me tell you about it. On Chief and Mother Anna’s sizeable acreage, here our old tribal lands, a comfortable home was built. Chief James Green built this house, or part of it, out of nice logs sturdily constructed. There was one large bedroom with a large fireplace for heat; other parts of the house were built from lumber. The kitchen was set off from the bedroom, large enough to cook and eat meals in, separate from the main part of the house, as was the custom due to fire hazard. Around 1910 Chief James Green and the children added a large size bedroom and two smaller rooms, also a hall and you will notice from the picture the breezeway and another fireplace. The Fireplace was built of rocks. There were two porches, one on the back and one on the front of the house. Later two smaller houses were built between the big house and the branch. There was a spring at this branch. The spring was the wash place for the family. The dirty clothes were washed in large wooden tubs, beat with a battling stick and rinsed three times in the wooden tubs. The battling block was a huge log, standing on end in the ground. There was a large barn where Chief James Green kept about 5 or 6 mules, he enjoyed mule trading. He always kept around 100 hogs and 50 cows, including two milk cows, so they had plenty of milk and buttermilk, butter, pork and chickens. Every winter, on days when the temperature was just right, was hog killing time. The meat that was not salted down was smoked and hung up in the smokehouse until ready to eat. There was a huge mulberry grove near the house where the children and grandchildren enjoyed romping and playing. Cotton was the main crop and source of income. In the early Fall, after the cotton was picked by hand, it was loaded on wagons and hauled by mules to the cotton gin, leaving before daybreak. After it was ginned and baled, a portion of it was picked up by the doctor, Robertson, in payment for medical bills accrued during the year. In this way the doctor could keep the bales of cotton until early spring and sell at higher prices.


I don’t remember when the syrup first began, but it was a booming business from the time cane ripened and lasted until all was made into syrup, or cooked into sugar, all that is, except the cane that was peeled and chewed to get the juice out like eating candy. The juice was squeezed by a large stone wheel mill pulled by two mules, then placed in an 80 gallon round kettle and cooked to desirable thickness as syrup or cooked on down to sugar. The fire was kept constant to create the correct temperature. Skimming’s or foam collected on top as the juice cooked and was skimmed off and thrown away. This 80 gallon kettle yielded 8 to 10 gallons of syrup and 5 to 6 gallons of sugar and was kept in a large wooden barrels when stored. Pulp from the cane called stripling’s were piled high between trees and all around turned brown when they dried. The Kids loved to play, jumping from one pile to another and hiding from one another behind the piles of dried pulp. The mill was a short distance from the house and was a gathering place of the Indian neighbors for miles around. Not many families in the Indian community owned their own mills, so those in the tribe all treated to a portion of the syrup as their part.


In later years around 1900 we had the tolling of the bell which could be heard for long distances, before 1900 we used a very large drum. This bell was used for calling the warriors or the men to and from the fields at meal time or to war. There was no sense in trying to finish a row because even the mules acted like they knew what the ringing of the bell meant, they were running in, like it or not. The bell was also used for emergencies, such as sickness, accidents and death.


Chief James Green and Mother Anna lived a full, happy life with their children. A few years before their deaths, they lived with their youngest child, Elmer Roy Green and his family. At the time of Chief James Green death, he and Anna only had 440 acres of land and properties, which started many, years before with the Village at Indian Creek and the money that Elizabeth Bledsole Green received from selling her lands in North Carolina to her brothers when Chief George the Otter Green and Elizabeth Bledsole Green had to run from the Armies of the United States.


We use to have a family reunion as far back as I can remember, at the Bethsaida Primitive Baptist Church and Cemetery in Barbour County Alabama. For weeks before the reunion, singing and dinner, there is and was beautifying of the cemetery. Each family and tribal member took responsibility of cleaning, clearing away weather beaten flowers and replacing them and usually hiring a cleaning crew. There was always beautiful music and singing by our people and dancing, delicious food, and plenty of it. I remember many times the table would be 2 and 3 and sometimes 4 rows a city block long filled with food to eat of all kinds. Everyone visited with each other and had a great time, my, these days have gone by and our tribal family story is true and so rewarding for all those who were and are a part of this Green Family history and tribe. In memory of all that came before us, what we can do is honor them and their history.

 

Wado Nihi

The Great Grandson of George The Otter Green

Principal Chief James Billy Chance


My father was, R,D. Chance, my mother was Susie Adel Joyner Chance; the mother of my father was Mandy Savanna Green Chance; My father’s father was James Robert Chance; My Mother’s Mother was Raine Leu Sapp Joyner; my mother’s father was Finnie Joyner; My Father’s Mother’s Father was Chief James Green; my father’s mother’s mother was Mother Anna Green; my Mother’s Mother was from the Moody Family who was part of the Chief Perryman family of the Creek Nation, and so on back in time.

  


THE BLEDSOLE AND GREEN SUR-NAME LIST:


BLEDSOLE, WEST, EDWARD, MARTIN, SWIFT, COX, RUDDICK, BROWN, GREEN, COOK, TAYLOR, ADKINSON, JONES, BYRID, PARKER, SESSOMS, WISE, HOLLOWAY, HATTAWAY,HALL, EDWARDS, RIALS, MUCCELL, SMITH, AUTRY, STANLEY, PIERCE, LEE, RIDGON, LAWTON, KING, WILSON, OWENSAPP, SANDERS, LASSITER, HOLLAND, HARPER, WILLIAMS, DYE, CHANNELL, CHANCE, VOSSBURG, POOLE, GOODWIN, CUMBIE, HORN, EVERETTE, SEAY, RASH, BOWDEN, WOODHAM, BUSH, PETERSON, GAUTIER, REMORE, CAROTHERS, BOGGS, FOY, DYKES, BEATY, CALHOUN, BOWDIN, DEVOREST,  HAIR, DONALDSON, CLARK, CULPEPPER, BURNS, GLOVER, MC WHORTER, DANIEL, BEASLEY, MORRISON, SNEAD, HARRISON, BOND,BRYAN,COPE, BENEFIELD, HAMILTON,JOYNER, MOORE, GILEHRIST, BENNETT, BALLENTINE, HARTZOG, PETERMAN, THOMAS, POPE, DICKENSON, BAXTON, BULLARD,  CARTER, GROOMS, CASHWELL, FLECK, HARVEY, DUVAL,BURNS, PERKINS, SERATING, HALL, EARLY, FAIRCLOTH, MACKATINA, OWEN, CULBREATH, HALES, JACKSON, STRICKLAND, SUGGS, ENGLISH, SIMMONS, DAVIS, POUNCEY, CHAMBERS,CROXTON,DUKE,  MORGAN, SOLOMON, NEWMAN, THROWER, GRAY, SWARINGEN, STRINGER, FINDLEY, FRAZIER, LANGLEY, BATTLE, WILLIAMSON, STOUGH, ROYAL, HALSTEAD, INGLEHART, BYRD, NEAL, JETER, MARSH, JEAN, CERVAS, COTTINGHAM, TALLEY, MATTHEWS, DUBOSE, CODY, HATCHER, PILATE,  VICKERY, DUNN, ANDERSON, OUTLAW, SCOTT, BOYD, BENNETT, GILL, TOLBERT, SIMPSON, SETTERS, FLEMING, BOUTWELL, DEBICE , HUMPHRIES, KELLY, SHEPPARD, GRAHAM, HILL, MITCHAM, MC MANNES,  KNIGHT, MAYS, MC NAUGHTON,  CHOP, PEGG, DUBOIS, TOLLESON,  BEINECKE, BORNHORST, ROACH, ALLISON, KEER, ALLISON, SHRADER, THOMPSON,  MITCHELL,  BRINKS, BLACKWELL,  HUTTO, BURKE, WHITE,  MC NORTON , GOODMAN, TUNSTALL,  BRADFORD, CARMICHAEL, GRIFFIN, MOORE, PRUITT, VATENTINE, PUGH,, MC INTYRE, OTT,  HARRISON , TRUETT, WEAVER, YOUNG, ROBINS, WRIGHT, JENKINS, PATRICK, DELANCY, ABNEY, DURDEN, MC CAULEY, SANDERSON , FREDERICK, HEADLEY, SCURLOCK, STILLINGS, FENDLEY, PARKER, HUNT, BAILEY, HUGHES, SHROEDER, TOWNSEND, BARNS, COCHENDORFER, SIMS, TINGLE,  KEATING, TERRY, DELANCY, JOHNSON, DANLEY, CHAMBERS, WARD, LOWERY, EARLY, DILL, BREWER, FOUNTAIN,  FALCONI, AVANT, HINSON, MC LEAN, DEAN, PLYMEL, SCHOELLES, ADELBURG, BARSTOW, MC CULLEY, BRANNEN, MOATES, RILEY, JENNINGS, OWEN, GANTT, CALVERT, MC CRAY, MILLER, BLOUNT, ZIEGLER, HELMS, BROOM, HARDAGE, COLQUETT, ARCHER, HINES, MOONEYHAM, REDMAN, MOORE, PAUL, WEEKS, DAY, SPIEGNER, PERRY, BLAIR, KILLINGWORTH, RUSSELL, WORSHAM, KAYWOOD, PLANT, GRACE, KELLY,CROWLEY, WELLS, GRIGGS, BARFIELD,HUBBARD, HANBERRY, LORD, BRASSO, QUALIES, LEE, COMMANDER, MURPLY, ANDREWS, LIMBAUGH, WHIGHAM, ARCHIE, HICKS, KERN, ADAMS, MERRITT, PILANT, REYNOLDS, CONNORSB, KANE, MORTERSON, DEBEEID, WATKINS, ELLIOTT, HOWELL, BALDWIN, MAY, HOUSE, NOFZIGER, BLISS, THOMPSON, FERREL, CHIAPETTA,  DRUMMOND, STOLL, HUDSON, WILLIAMSON, ALLEN, FARMER, DONALDSON, VINSON, IVEY, DYER, DIXON, GAGE, WITZ, WOODY, FLOREZ, NORRIS, CHATHAM, PHILLIPS, MORGAN, CASEY, RHINEHART, MEYER, CARMICHAEL, EPPERSON, HAUVERSBURK, ROY, MC CLELLAND, MEADORS, DENNARK, JORDAN, GRANT, SEER, MC CARTY, SERMONS, WEBB, ROBINSON,SCHOFIELD,TAYLOR, ASHBY, HOBBS, HATTAWAY, HUDSON, SAUCIER, TRIANTAFILLOU, SIMPLER, WILKS, JOHNSON, POWELL, TOMLIN, SASSER, ADKISSON, BUTLER, SCROGGINS, ADKINSON, OLIVER, MULLINSBENNETT, DYKES, KATHLEEN, EMANUEL, BREWINGTON, BURNETTE, WARRICK, FARRIS, SIMMONS, STRAYHORN, BULLOCK, CARTER, HOWELL, MC LEMORE, AVERITT, RICE, HEDGPETH, SPRYE, YATES, WAYLAND, KINLAW, DUNHAM, MC CULLEN, ALLEN , BATTON, GARDNER, BRISSON,  MC DANIEL, PEACOCK, WORLEY, PACK, MURPHY, SCHULTZ, RUSS, SIDNEY, LYDAY, SADLER, BOWEN, EDGE, CALDWELL, MINCE, TATUM, CAIN, HALL, BRISSON, TATUS, PRIDGEN, MERRITT, TANNER, BLACKWELL, FARMER, BASS, GUTHRIE, FAIRCLOTH, CAISON, CRUMPLER, CAMPBELL, HANN, GEROW, MELVIN, DAVIS, BORDEAUX, KNOWLES, CANADY, MOZINGO, RACKLEY, NORRIS, WISEMAN, PETERSON, JERIGAN, BEASLEY, GUTTEY, JOLLY, STONE, NEW, WINDHAM, WOODS, ZORN,TRIPP, TURNER,  TYLER, UNGER, VANN, WALL, WALLACE, WATKINS, WATSON, WELCH, DONALDSON, ENFINGER, FABER, FARMER, FENN,FINLAYSON, FRAZIER, FULLER, GILLENWATER, GILMER, GLOVER, GOINS,GRANT, GREELY, GREENE,HILLMAN, HOLTNEY, HORNE, HOUSTON, HOWARD, HUBBARD, JENKINS, JORDAN, JUDKINS,KEALY, KENNEDY, KEY, KILPATRICK, KOPPE, LAUDERDALE, LAW LANGLEY,MATHISON, MAYO, MERRIMAN, MITCHELL,BAKER, BARTHOLF, BOWLING, BROOKS, BROWN, BRYAN, BUIE, BURLISON, BUTLER, CALUB, CODY, COLE, COOK, COVINGTON,CURRIE, DANIEL,DAVIS , DAWSON, DEAL, DELONG, DILLARD, DIXON, MITCHELL, MOON, MOSLEY, MC BRIDE,  MC CAIN, MC CLELLAN, MC DOWELL, MC VAY,  O’PRY, OSMOND, OXFORD, PAYNE, PETTIGREW, RANDALL, RENFROE, RIDLEY, ROBERTSON, RODGERS, SCROGGINS, SHINE,  SIMS, SHEPHERD, SMITH, STANLEY, STELL, TAYLOR, ABERNATHY, ADLER, ALSPACH, BAILEYBARNES,  BENEDICT, BITTLE, BLAKE, BLEVINS, BOYN, BRASHEAR, BREEDLOVE, BRUMFIELD,BRYANT, BUCKLER, BURGENCAMDENCASEY, CHARLTON, CHASE, CHILDS, COATS, COFER, COIL, COLLEY, COLLINS, CROSSWHITE, DONNIHUE,DOWNEY, DUL, DUNBAR, DUSKY, DUVALL, EDWARDS, ESRY, EWENS, FAIRBOUGH, FARRAR, FINNEY, FORBIS,FORTNEY, JOYNER, FOUNTAIN, FOUTS, FRAY, GALLUP, GARLE, GIBSON, GLEASON, GOSLIN, WREN, ZEHNDER, YOUNG, SILVER, SILVERS,SKINNER, SMALLWOOD, STEWART, THRELKELD,TRIBBLE,TUCKER, WAINSCOTT, WALTER, WASLEY, WHITNEY, WILBUR, WINAND, WOODSMALL, WREN, ROBERTS, SANDERS, SAVLEY, SCHOOLER, SENOR, SETTLE, SEXTON, SEYMOUR, SHAFER, SHEA, SHELDON, SHOCK, SHORT, NEAL, O’BRIEN, PALMER, PATRICK, PEACHER,PIGG, PORTER, PRATT, PURDY, RAMSEY, REAMS, REED, RIDGEWAY, MC GREW, MC HENRY, MC KENZIE, MC MAHON, MC NEAR, ,MC QUINTY, MC QUOWN, MOFFITT, MORRIS,  MURRY, MYERS, NEAL,  KETCHUM, KNIFONG, LANGLEN, LANNING, LARUE, LENITON, LITTLE, LOGSDEN, LONDON, MAHANNEY, MCGREW, GREGATH, HAFER, HANCOCK, HARDIN, HARDNE, HARRIS, HENDREN, HILL, HINES, HOUCHENS, HULEN, HULZER, HUSK, JENNINGS, KEENE, KELLY, KETCHUM, CATES.

 

 

THERE IS MOST LIKELY MANY MORE SUR-NAMES THAT MAKES UP THE BLEDSOLE AND GREEN FAMILYS  .

tribal_phone_case.jpg

Click here to purchase this tribal phone and view the other great items in our store!

new_seal1827_9619.pngBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpgBackground-62-1024.jpg